Your Seasonal Guide for Fall Lawn Care in Medford, Oregon

Fall is one of the busiest times for families in the Medford, Oregon area, which makes it not surprising to hear that many homeowners often forget to make time to care for their lawn and landscapes during the season. While most people concentrate on raking the leaves that accumulate on their property, it’s vital to realize that a yard requires proper care to keep it in good condition come next spring. Refer to the following lawn care tips for fall to help you nurture your lawn this season.

Pull Weeds

If you make time to eliminate weeds now, you will end up with less to contend with next season.

Rake Leaves and Debris

In addition to raking and removing the leaves in your front and back yard, eliminate any other debris you come across such as acorns, loose grass, plant remains, sticks, or other unnecessary materials.

Seed and Fertilize

After the heat of the summer has passed, your lawn will need some nourishment prior to the onset of winter. Therefore, fall is the best time of the year for seeding and fertilizing. Ideally, you will want to plan to fertilize your lawn at some point between September and early November. You’ll also want to seed any bare or dead patches of grass to ensure your lawn’s condition and color is restored when spring comes along.

Ensure Your Grass Stays 2 to 2 ½ inches tall

If your grass grows taller than three inches, it is more likely to mat and lead to damage during the winter. On the other hand, cutting your lawn shorter than 2 inches can impede its ability to nourish itself and can propel excessive weed growth.

Water Plants

Provide your trees and bushes with a comprehensive watering after the leaves have fallen off their branches. While you are at it, make a point to prune your plants to protect them from disease and damage as the weather gets colder.

Shut Off Your Outdoor Water Lines

Make sure you don’t forget to shut off your outdoor water lines this season to protect your system from freezing and damage inflicted by contact with the cold winter air.